2016

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Daniël van den Berg

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You may not have noticed it: but today there was a parallel session with 200 participants about real estate. Daniel van den Berg (architect) comes with a message for the audience: obviously you missed something. An interesting session with four perspective on the future of health care real estate. Including Harry van Goor, surgeon in the Radboudumc, a person who likes to disrupt. He has the idea for a room with a view: the interior of a patient room could reduce stress and use of medication.
Wiegerink architects and Arbol healthcare took the audience along the different trends in Dutch healthcare landscape, and the consequences of this trends. People want to feel at home, therefore we have to re-invent our profession. Daniel van den Berg tells about the world wide campus environment and the future of it. Finally, René Bleeker, director of real estate of the Radboudumc, explains how we can be very smart in timing what we need in hardware.

Everything is recorded: do watch it!

This brings Jopie and Eva on the use of technology to make their lives easier. The possibilities are endless. But in the technological storm, we will also need ‘slow medicine’ as Jopie explains, because there should always be time to listen to the needs of the patients. The use of technology is not the same as automated care. It makes human care more powerful. And smart technology gives patients a growing opportunity to participate in society. As long as children continue to code, and know how to listen to the patient, the future is promising.

https://www.coderdojo.nl/

Liveblog written by

Marcel Wortel

Peter Hinssen

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“Its the best of times. Its the worst of times.” Peter Hinssen quotes Charles Dickens to start his talk. What he means is that technology goes so fast that it becomes impossible to grasp. This gives opportunities and fear at the same time. People like Peter Hinssen are obviously very excited about all the technological opportunities. But a lot of healthcare providers are not, according to Peter. And that attitude is not without risk.

We tend to spend a lot of time on today’s issues. Tomorrow receives lesser attention. But the time spent on the future is nearly zero. That’s where the risk is. If we don’t spend enough time on the day after tomorrow, the transformation of an organisation is in danger. And if there’s one thing that days like Our Future Health point out is that these transformation is inevitably at hand.

If we spend enough time on the day after tomorrow we will see the changes ahead in what we know about ourselves, what we measure, how healthcare is organized, and how we treat patients. What’s the endpoint? Treating death? Peter leaves us thinking about that.

Liveblog written by

Marcel Wortel

Eva Eikhout & Jopie Verhoeven

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It’s been said so often: patients must be included in healthcare innovation. Jopie Verhoeven and Eva Eikhout make this message reality. As chairholders of the Patient Advisory Group and Children Advisory Group of the Radboudumc they are involved in a lot of developments: from healthcare to education to research. They bring Roos (11) on stage who participated in the Coder Dojo where elementary school children learn to code. The message is simple: technology is already incorporated in todays health. If we don’t teach children to code, we will lose touch with the development of healthcare technology in the future.

This brings Jopie and Eva on the use of technology to make their lives easier. The possibilities are endless. But in the technological storm, we will also need ‘slow medicine’ as Jopie explains, because there should always be time to listen to the needs of the patients. The use of technology is not the same as automated care. It makes human care more powerful. And smart technology gives patients a growing opportunity to participate in society. As long as children continue to code, and know how to listen to the patient, the future is promising.

https://www.coderdojo.nl/

Liveblog written by

Marcel Wortel

Neelie Kroes & Minister Edith Schippers

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Why not put our three technical universities together? That is a plea Neelie Kroes, ambassador of StartUp Delta makes in an interview at OurFutureHealth. She thinks that if university’s work together we can make the Netherlands the best place on earth for eHealth. The audience seems te agree with this idea, for the rising applause is very loud.

Kroes is interviewed together with the Dutch ministry on health, Edith Schippers. Schippers says we need eHealth for financial sustainability and that it is important to empower people. But healthcare is way behind other sectors, experiences Schippers. ‘I can buy roses online, but I still have pons cards for hospitals in my wallet. That’s technology of the fifty’s!’

Change will most likely come from the startups, both woman agree. Starts ups are ‘so fascinating’ Kroes says. Why is there not a Funda.nl yet for the healthcare? Entering the market of health is difficult admits Schippers, for he healthcare market is not a free market, so it is much harder to compete. Schippers says the government wants to fasten innovation.

Schippers expects much of the new generation doctors who will be uses to technology in all parts of their live. But for innovation we need first standardization and one language. Schippers encourages startups to include doctors and patients in their development, fort they know what they need.

The Netherlands are a top country in ehealth, but there is still a lot to do. Cooperation is the key, claims Kroes. Universities, students, doctors, nurses and startups should learn from each other.

Liveblog written by

Karin Oost

Leon van Halder

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And we are off with an introduction of @LucienEngelen who introduces Leon van Halder, the chairman of the Radboudumc.
Leon starts with what drives him and the people at Radboudumc: Harry, one of their patients. Innovation is one of the important pillars to the future of patient care. Cooperation, Sharing and Acceleration: these are the three magic words for innovation. This day is an example to help in this by sharing the content for the next twenty four hours!
Lucien Engelen is introduced by Leon though of course he hardly needs an introduction anymore. Core of his talk is of course the patient. By creating and sharing knowledge we are able to improve care and health. Leon: what is your challenge? Lucien: startups are the driving force of innovation. Our challenge is. amongst others, to let Radboudumc be the biggest startup in healthcare.
Liveblog written by

Martijn Kriens

Yuri van Geest

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The tsunami of 2004. We all know the YouTube movies and recognize the dangerous wave, growing into an all destroying flood.

Yuri van Geest uses this picture for two reasons.
(1) First: the tsunami is a metaphor for our world today. Developments grow exponential. For example: the new quantum computer is 100 million times faster than the conventional computer. Or another example: in 20 years robots have taken over 80% of our current jobs.
(2) Second: the tsunami is about human nature. We try to understand new phenomonals with our own thinking.

Since 2008 Yuri van Geest is actively involved in the global movement of the Singularity. The Singularity University focuses on accelerating Technologies. More information on www.singularityu.org.

Liveblog written by

Marcel Wortel

Jeeshan Chowdhury & Lindee David

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Lindee founded Joule, a subsidiary of the Canadian Medical Association. For Linda it delivers the dream job. The goal of Joule is to create innovation in the healthcare system and help advance disruptive ideas by physicians. Hacking Health, an innovation council are some of the activities they set up. Also, by supplying seed money they are able to help innovators bring the innovations to healthcare. Joule started a month ago so there a no real examples yet but there are great ambitions.
Jeeshan
What are the big ideas in healthcare innovation. Big data? For David the challenge is that there is a culture of “No, you can’t …”. HackingHealth is founded to create an environment where “No, you can’t” is changed in “Yes, you can try”. Until now there have been 50 Health Hackathons. These hackathons show to people that new ideas and change is possible.
After the final No there comes a Yes! – Wallace Stevens
Liveblog written by

Martijn Kriens

Piet Heijn van Mechelen

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Sixteen years ago I was sitting on the couch. Alone. Unable to work. No energy. Grumpy … Piet-Heijn van Mechelen pictures the audience his experience with his Sleep Apnea Syndrome. The first symptoms aren’t alarming, and look a lot like a serious hangover. But over time they get worse .…

And it took long to find out what it was. With a big impact on his life. “All because I didn’t know”. And that has to be prevented.
But that’s more easy said than done. He describes the Dutch Healthcare System as a triangle with very unequal corners: Healthcare Companies as big institutions, Physicians and hospitals as big players. And then patients: the Calimero’s. Small, and that’s not fair. And in the middle of the triangle a lousy 74.4 billion to be divided every year.

The Patient Academy aims to support patients’ organizations in their role as a professional partner in the Dutch healthcare system.

Liveblog written by

Pieter de Winter

Lisanne van Zwol

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I’m not straight either, was a text on a flag Lisanne van Zwol and her collegeaus of kromkommer.nl were holding on the gayparade. The textline referred to a curved cucumber. This was part of a big campaign to lay focus on the amount of food that is waisted because of disapproved looks. Lisanne now owns a company that makes healthy products of these otherwise waisted foods.

She started a few years ago, just graduated as psychologist. With friends she collected disapproved food in her town. Within two hours her bag was full. How much food is my city throwing away? How much is the world throwing away?, she wondered. The answer: of every bite we eat, there is one bite being thrown away. She asked: How to make people fall in love with imperfect food?

That is the basic thought of her company. She had a dream to prevent food being waisted and made it into a success. One of the first experiments, soup of curved cucumbers, became a success. Shops wanted it on the shelves. So she starte a crowdfunding campaign to be able to really make more products, named wonkies. They are sold now in more than 170 shops in the Netherlands.

Cucumbers  may nog be straight, but the can nevertheless be delicious. For the audience she has a message: if you have a dream: start to work on it en keep believing in it. “You can make a difference”. She made a difference with cucumbers that weren’t straight.

Liveblog written by

Karin Oost

H.R.H. Princess Laurentien van Oranje

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Why not put our three technical universities together? That is a plea Neelie Kroes, ambassador of StartUp Delta makes in an interview at OurFutureHealth. She thinks that if university’s work together we can make the Netherlands the best place on earth for eHealth. The audience seems te agree with this idea, for the rising applause is very loud.

Kroes is interviewed together with the Dutch ministry on health, Edith Schippers. Schippers says we need eHealth for financial sustainability and that it is important to empower people. But healthcare is way behind other sectors, experiences Schippers. ‘I can buy roses online, but I still have pons cards for hospitals in my wallet. That’s technology of the fifty’s!’

Change will most likely come from the startups, both woman agree. Starts ups are ‘so fascinating’ Kroes says. Why is there not a Funda.nl yet for the healthcare? Entering the market of health is difficult admits Schippers, for he healthcare market is not a free market, so it is much harder to compete. Schippers says the government wants to fasten innovation.

Schippers expects much of the new generation doctors who will be uses to technology in all parts of their live. But for innovation we need first standardization and one language. Schippers encourages startups to include doctors and patients in their development, fort they know what they need.

The Netherlands are a top country in ehealth, but there is still a lot to do. Cooperation is the key, claims Kroes. Universities, students, doctors, nurses and startups should learn from each other.

Liveblog written by

Pieter de Winter

Daniel Kraft

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We’ve seen Daniel Kraft before. He’s been a speaker at previous TEDx events. This time he talks to us through Skype, since he’s in the middle of becoming a father and didn’t dare to leave home. As before his talk is difficult to grasp in a few words. What it comes down to is that technology will assist us more and more in healthcare. In conduction healthy behaviour, in point of care diagnostics and in smarter and cheaper interventions. All these changes are gradually, but the pace is increasing. It is the exponential growth of technology that drives the speed of change. Daniel shows us the wide range of possibilities, as he did before. The big question that remains is when these developments change from ‘geek stuff’ into everyday technology. Because that it will, is certain.

Liveblog written by

Marcel Wortel